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The financial downturn has been even harder on consumers with credit issues. Poor money decisions can strand them in a world of no: no approval, no loan, no hope. So when they go to a traditional car dealership, instead of a new ride, they get runaround and refusal.

Enter the DriveTime Credit Rescue Squad.

Two hyper-enthusiastic, hopelessly dorky young women in a homemade rescue vehicle, they’re the heroes of the new D/C-created campaign for America’s number-one used car dealer for people with credit issues. Now when a credit-crunched car shopper has a problem, the Rescue Squad screeches in to deliver them to automotive salvation. Because, in addition to selling cars, DriveTime is a bank that can provide riskier loans.

Shot by comedic directorial team, Adam & Dave, for production company Arts & Sciences, the commercials borrow liberally from old cop shows and buddy flicks to give what is too often a downbeat credit message a fresh, fun spin. The spots begin running today in major markets across the country.

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They’ve got the technology, inventory and financing to put you in your dream-mobile. That’s the message of Duncan/Channon’s three new DriveTime spots, the first of which launched nationally today. The campaign is the first by D/C for this new client, one of the largest used auto dealers in the world, and includes radio. The TV was shot at DriveTime’s Las Vegas dealership. @Radical was the production company and Rosey the director. Take ’em for a drive right here.

More after the jump.

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With over 94 dealerships across the country and half-a-million cars sold, DriveTime is the largest auto dealer helping consumers buy a great used car with or without great credit. After a comprehensive search driven by Pile & Company, the acceleration-minded company signed Duncan/Channon, the original pedal-to-the-metal agency, as its strategic and creative partner. And the agency, already developing a new DriveTime TV and radio campaign for early 2013, is pumped.

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